Considering Hospice?

Questions, Answers, and Dispelling the Myths Regarding Hospice Care

Is it Time for Hospice?

Here are some of the signs that could qualify you or loved one for hospice.


  • No longer wanting to continue aggressive treatment or chemotherapy
  • A desire to not go back to the hospital
  • Uncontrolled pain
  • Frequent hospitalizations and ER visits
  • Frequent Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)
  • Wounds that will not heal
  • Increased confusion and weakness
  • Decreased urine output
  • Significant weight Loss
  • Frequent falls and weakness
  • Decrease in the amount of food or fluids being consumed
  • Sleeping more
  • Increased need for assistance with daily activities

Please contact Agape Hospice Care at (404) 763-1456 or contact us to have

one of our healthcare professionals meet with you to discuss options for care.

Frequently Asked Question

Here are some of the questions we are frequently asked regarding hospice.


Who pays for hospice?

Hospice is 100% covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurances.

Where can Agape Hospice Care’s services be provided?

Services can be provided in the individual’s home, long-term care or assisted living facility, skilled nursing facility, or any other appropriate setting.

Please contact Agape Hospice Care at (404) 763-1456 or contact us to have

one of our healthcare professionals meet with you to discuss options for care.

Dispelling Hospice Myths


Hospice is giving up

Hospice is medical care toward the goal of comfort and dignity for someone whose life is drawing to a close. It is, in fact, the “something more” for someone who has been told nothing more can be done for them.

Hospice is only for

cancer patients

Not anymore. When hospice began in the U.S. in the mid-1970s, most hospice patients had cancer. Today, while many hospice patients have cancer, the majority have other life-limiting illnesses such as end-stage heart, lung or kidney disease, or Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Hospice is where

you go to die

Hospice is medical care toward the goal of comfort and dignity for someone whose life is drawing to a close. It is, in fact, the “something more” for someone who has been told nothing more can be done for them.

Hospice means I’m

going to die soon

Studies show exactly the opposite. Although hospice care neither hastens death nor prolongs life, patients with certain illnesses actually live somewhat longer with hospice care than those with the same illness who don’t choose hospice care. And regardless of the illness, patient/family satisfaction with services received are consistently higher when hospice is involved.

You can’t keep your own doctor if you enter hospice

Your family doctor or specialist is encouraged to remain engaged in your care. The Hospice Physician works closely with your doctor – who knows you better (medically) than anyone else – to determine the specific medical needs that will be addressed in your individual plan of care.

It is the Dr’s responsibility to bring up hospice

While it is the physician’s responsibility to determine whether a patient meets the medical eligibility criteria to receive hospice services, it is appropriate for the patient (or caregiver) to initiate the discussion if they choose. Since hospices consistently hear from their patients/families that they wish they had gotten hospice care sooner, it is a good idea to let the physician know AT THE TIME OF DIAGNOSIS that you are open to discussing hospice care at the appropriate time.

Once you choose hospice there’s no turning back

You are free to leave a hospice program at any time for any reason without penalty. You can re-enroll in a hospice program any time that you meet the medical eligibility criteria.

If you choose hospice you won’t get other medical care

While the hospice team will provide all aspects of care for the illness that qualifies you for hospice services, you are still free to seek treatment for unrelated illnesses or conditions. For example, if you are receiving hospice care for heart disease, you can still get treatment for a broken bone.

Hospice requires a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) Order

The purpose and benefit of hospice care is to allow for a peaceful passing in a comfortable and familiar setting like home with loved ones near. While many people wish to have a DNR to avoid unnecessary medical intervention and hospitalization, you are not required to have a DNR to receive hospice care.

Disabled people can’t receive hospice care

Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) live much longer today and generally die of the same illnesses and conditions present in the general population. While state and local regulations may be barriers in some locations, the same hospice care provided to any patient/family is generally available to those with I/DD, whether in a group home or another residential setting, and can include support for direct care staff. Also, it is important to recognize and respect that many individuals with I/DD have the capacity to participate in decisions about their end-of-life care, whether through an advance directive or in conversation, and should be informed about their illness, the options available, and the type of care those choices involve.

CREDIT: Dispelling Hospice Myths was written by the Hospice Foundation of America, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Please contact Agape Hospice Care at (404) 763-1456 or contact us to have

one of our healthcare professionals meet with you to discuss options for care.

24/7 CARE LINE

(404) 763-1456